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AWS - free tier SQS quota

  • Thread starter Thread starter fudo
  • Start date Start date
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fudo

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I have a simple personal project I work on from time to time to learn AWS.

Recently I received an alert emailk from aws stating that I'm reaching the free tier quota for one or more services with the following table:

ProductAWS Free Tier Usage as of 06/27/2024Usage LimitAWS Free Tier Usage Limit
AWSQueueService863587 Requests1000000 Requests1000000.0 Requests are always free per month as part of AWS Free Usage Tier (Global-Requests)

The project is mostly serverless architecture developed with the CDK, it has not and never will reach a production stage, no one will ever see nor use it, barely I use it a part from some testing calls.

The project have 4 SQS queuese, each of which trigger a single Lambda function, so checking the monitoring section of each queue I see all the charts are 0 except for Number of Empty Receives: enter image description here enter image description here enter image description here enter image description here

I'm still learning on AWS services integrations, so what comes to my mind is that Lambda is continuously polling SQS, thus making requests, while I tought that where SQS the one calling Lambda when new messages where ready, is that correct?

If it is so, how can I reduce the calls from Lambda to SQS? I'm not interested in performance, I just want to not exceed the monthly free tier quota.
<p>I have a simple personal project I work on from time to time to learn AWS.</p>
<p>Recently I received an alert emailk from aws stating that I'm reaching the free tier quota for one or more services with the following table:</p>
<div class="s-table-container"><table class="s-table">
<thead>
<tr>
<th>Product</th>
<th>AWS Free Tier Usage as of 06/27/2024</th>
<th>Usage Limit</th>
<th>AWS Free Tier Usage Limit</th>
</tr>
</thead>
<tbody>
<tr>
<td>AWSQueueService</td>
<td>863587 Requests</td>
<td>1000000 Requests</td>
<td>1000000.0 Requests are always free per month as part of AWS Free Usage Tier (Global-Requests)</td>
</tr>
</tbody>
</table></div>
<p>The project is mostly serverless architecture developed with the CDK, it has not and never will reach a production stage, no one will ever see nor use it, barely I use it a part from some testing calls.</p>
<p>The project have 4 SQS queuese, each of which trigger a single Lambda function, so checking the monitoring section of each queue I see all the charts are 0 except for <strong>Number of Empty Receives</strong>:
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<p>I'm still learning on AWS services integrations, so what comes to my mind is that Lambda is continuously polling SQS, thus making requests, while I tought that where SQS the one calling Lambda when new messages where ready, is that correct?</p>
<p>If it is so, how can I reduce the calls from Lambda to SQS? I'm not interested in performance, I just want to not exceed the monthly free tier quota.</p>
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